About Power Loney Paralegal & Court Agent Services

In Alberta, a Court Agent and Paralegal is allowed by law to do many things typically done by a lawyer. Our services are considerably more cost effective as well.

The name 'Power Loney' comes from Ken’s Grandfather, Joseph Loney. Originally from Ireland, Joseph and another Irishmen, Alexander Power, established Power Loney Ltd. in downtown Edmonton on Jasper Avenue, which was a well known and respected haberdashery, and was originally established in 1925. We therefore chose to carry on the company name when we started our business in southern Alberta.

We are experienced and may be able to assist you with your legal concerns

Kenneth H. Montgomery

Kenneth H. Montgomery

Owner / General Manager

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About Ken

Ken’s previous career was with the Edmonton Police Service, and he retired in 2000 after twenty-five years. The majority of Ken's police service was as a detective in the Criminal Investigation Division (CID), and included assignments in Strike Force (targeting career criminals and serious offenders), Integrated Intelligence (with the RCMP) and Armed Robbery Units, with secondments to Homicide and Sex Crimes Units. Ken and his wife Brenda then moved to Medicine Hat to establish their own business, Power Loney Paralegal.


The name 'Power Loney' comes from Ken’s Grandfather, Joseph Loney. Originally from Ireland, Joseph and another Irishmen, Alexander Power, established Power Loney Ltd. in downtown Edmonton on Jasper Avenue, which was a well known and respected haberdashery, and was originally established in 1925. We therefore chose to carry on the company name when we started our business in southern Alberta.


In Alberta, a Court Agent and Paralegal is allowed by law to do many things typically done by a lawyer, but we cannot do everything that a lawyer can. Our services are considerably more cost effective as well.


Ken is particularly concerned about assisting those who cannot afford a lawyer and do not qualify for Legal Aid, so these people may properly access legal services. Ken was extremely pleased to be allowed to address Alberta's Court of Appeal (as maybe the first non-lawyer in Alberta) on the issue of non-lawyer representation, which is documented in the case Pacer Enterprises Ltd. v Cummings (2004) 346 A.R. 161 (C.A.).


Ken was further involved in establishing case law respecting a Court Agent's limits with respect to representing an individual for multiple summary conviction offences. In Ken's first case R. v. Spiry, 2005 ABPC 309, the Honourable Judge Fradsham said no. In Ken's second case R. v. May, 2008 ABPC 59, the Honourable Judge LeGrandeur said yes. This posed a problem as a tie breaker was needed and this had to come from a higher court. An opportunity presented itself in 2011 when Ken was involved with another person charged with multiple summary conviction charges and the trial judge decided to side with Judge Fradsham. That decision, pursued as a request for Mandamus, was put before Justice W.V. Hembroff in Alberta's Court of Queen's Bench. In January 2012 Justice Hembroff agreed with Judge LeGrandeur and the lower Courts are now bound to allow Court agents to represent those charged with multiple summary conviction offences (where the maximum penalty is no more than six months). Citation R. v. Trudeau, 2012 ABQB 14 refers.


Ken's ongoing effort on helping out the little guy was in part recognized later in 2012, when Ken was awarded the Queen's Diamond Jubilee medal.


Mike Duffy

Mike Duffy

Associate

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About Mike

Mike was born in England, and raised and educated in Saskatchewan. He initially served as a Bobby with the Metropolitan Police in London. Returning to Canada, Mike then joined the RCMP and served a full 28 year career with all of his operational service being completed in Alberta. His duties included traffic law enforcement, collision investigation, general uniform duties and being a radar and laser operator instructor.


In 2006, Mike was one of the nine original police officers who established the Alberta Sheriff Highway Patrol, and was also one of the key radar and laser operator instructors. Mike was the Sergeant in charge of Southeastern Alberta, and retired from the Sheriffs in June, 2014.


While with the RCMP, Mike was a member of the Staff Relations program for 12 years. He was an Employment Standards officer for South Eastern Alberta with the Government of Alberta and a Steward with the AUPE for his time with the Sheriff Highway Patrol. He has 20 years experience with Federal and Alberta Labour Law in resolving employer/employee conflict.


In 2012 Mike was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for service to policing and community. Mike and his wife relocated to Lethbridge to be closer to family.